Strategy

Rubric

Scoring Guide, Grading Criteria

UDL 6.1 UDL 6.4

A Rubric is a table or matrix that provides a list of criteria or learning targets for an assignment (e.g. topic sentence, supporting details, concluding statement, spelling and punctuation) and gradations of quality with descriptions of what work would look like at each level (e.g. advanced, meets standard, approaching standard). Rubrics are given to students prior to beginning a task, to make the learning targets and expectations clear. Students are encouraged to reference the Rubric as they complete the task, to ensure all required and expected elements meet expectations. Afterward, the Rubric is used to evaluate students' work and provide specific feedback around observed strengths and areas for improvement. Because Rubrics explicitly describe the expectations for a high-quality product or performance, students can use the rubric as a step-by-step guide for how to revise their work or improve on similar tasks in the future. The use of Rubrics focuses both the student and teacher on the learning goals, resulting in increased student engagement and overall learning.

Ready-to-Use Resources

Templates

3 Performance Levels: Rubric Template

A set of rubric templates that can be populated for multiple grade levels and content areas. Templates in this set include rubrics with three performance categories, with and without points.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, Math · 4 pages


Templates

4 Performance Levels: Rubric Template

A set of rubric templates that can be populated for multiple grade levels and content areas. Templates in this set include rubrics with four performance categories, with and without points.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, Math · 2 pages


Templates

5 Performance Levels: Rubric Template

A set of rubric templates that can be populated for multiple grade levels and content areas. Templates in this set include rubrics with five performance categories, with and without points.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, Math · 2 pages


Templates

List Form: Rubric Template

A rubric list template that can be used for grading purposes or to assist students in planning.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, Math · 1 pages


Templates

Teacher Feedback: Rubric Template

A rubric template with space for teacher notes that can be used when providing extended feedback.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Reading, Writing, Listening, Speaking, Math · 1 pages


Rubric

Claim-Evidence-Explanation Rubric: 4 Points

This rubric provides a way to measure proficiency on student responses that prompt students to provide 2 pieces of textual evidence and explanation to support a claim.

Grade 6, 7, 8 · Reading · 1 pages


Rubric

Claim-Evidence-Explanation Rubric: 5 Points

This rubric provides a way to measure proficiency on student responses that prompt students to provide 3 pieces of textual evidence and explanation to support a claim.

Grade 8 · Reading · 1 pages


Implementation Tips

Online Tools
There are several online tools to help you create Rubrics for your classroom. Check out [[http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php | Rubistar]] and [[http://www.teach-nology.com/web_tools/rubrics/general/ | Teachnology’s General Rubric Generator]]. For pre-made CCSS-aligned rubrics, check out [[http://www.bie.org/objects/cat/rubrics|Buck Institute for Education's Rubrics]]
Developing a Rubric
When creating a rubric for an assignment, review examples of good and poor work. As you develop criteria and performance levels, consider the following questions:
  • What is the best that can be done?
  • What contributes to it being the best? How is poor work different?
  • What counts most in this project or assignment?
  • What skills do I want students to learn or practice?
Language Choice in Rubric
Be sure to use language that students can easily understand when making a Rubric. Icons or symbols can be used to represent achievement levels for younger students (e.g. smiley faces, a varying number of stars, thumbs-up/down signs, etc.). Also, try to avoid using negative or vague language when describing performance levels.
Use of Exemplars
It is helpful to go over the Rubric for a particular assignment when introducing the task to the class. Take some time to clarify what high-level performance looks like for each learning target. If possible, provide exemplars or models to illustrate expected performance.
Self-Assessment Tool
Remind students to use the Rubric as a “final check” before turning in an assignment. To promote self-assessment, ask students to check their work against the criteria described and consider their level of performance. Encourage students to make revisions as needed.
Parent Teacher Conferences
Rubrics from completed assignments are great to have on hand during parent-teacher conferences to illustrate to parents their child’s progress toward learning targets.
Standardize Rubrics Through Collaboration with Colleagues
Consider collaborating with grade-level or departmental colleagues to create and share Rubrics for common assignments or tasks. This helps standardize grading practices and clarify expectations for student learning.

Examples

Lower Elementary
To introduce Rubrics to students, have the class practice oral presentation skills with a familiar “show and tell” activity. Ask students to bring in an object that is important to them. Help students prepare a short 2-3 minute presentation explaining how they got the object and why it is important to them. (For students who are not able to write, have them draw sequential pictures that will remind them of what they want to say.) Then share an oral presentation rubric with the class similar to this one from the Buck Institute: [[http://www.cueroisd.org/userfiles/10/Presentation_Rubric_K-2_2013.pdf |K-2 Presentation Rubric]]. Model “good” and “bad” examples of each criteria (e.g. looking at the ground while speaking vs. looking at your audience). Have students practice their presentation with partners and give each other feedback using the rubric. After giving students some time to practice their presentations at home and at school, provide time for students to present in class and provide feedback for each student using the rubric.
Upper Elementary
When working on a comprehensive writing assignment, such as an opinion essay, use a Rubric to support students in including all of the critical parts. For instance, an opinion essay Rubric may illustrate the levels of quality for each of the following components: Topic Sentence, Supporting Reasons, Linking Words & Concluding Statement.
Middle School
When assessing open response math problems, use a Rubric that focuses on students’ ability to communicate their math reasoning and use appropriate procedures, like the [[http://www.exemplars.com/assets/files/puzzle.pdf | Jigsaw Student Rubric]] from Exemplars. Discuss with students what a high quality open response should include based on the Rubric. To help students practice providing strong open response answers, break them into small groups and provide each group with a problem based on what the class has been studying. Give each group a large sheet of paper for their response. Use the Rubric to evaluate each group’s work and give suggestions for improvement.
High School
When planning a multifaceted group project for older students, create a Rubric for each component of the project. For example, for a research project describing the impact of a key leader during the American Revolution you might use the following Rubrics:
  1. Informational Writing Rubric -- assessing the written report for organization, topic development (including relevant facts and concrete details), use of transitions and precise language, and grammar/language conventions
  2. Presentation Rubric -- focusing on key skills needed to effectively communicate such as eye contact and body language, voice, and use of appropriate visuals
  3. Collaboration Rubric -- emphasizing important aspects of teamwork including respect for others, individual responsibility and contributions, and working together
Behavior/Social
For students with behavior or social difficulties, create a Rubric focusing on positive behaviors such as positive attitude, effort, participation, and respect for others. A Rubric encouraging cooperative behaviors during recess and lunch periods can be especially beneficial for younger students. In a recess Rubric, some of the criteria might include taking turns, using equipment safely, and using kind words.

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