Strategy

Revision

Multiple Drafts, Incorporating Feedback, Writing Process

UDL 5.3

Revision is the process of returning to a previously drafted piece of writing to incorporate feedback, add on, and refine specific elements of the assignment. Revising builds students' understanding of writing as a process that is ongoing, reflective, and nuanced, and can facilitate self-assessment and academic goal setting. Teachers may ask students to consider a particular question when revising or to incorporate a newly learned skill or strategy. When returning drafts to students with comments and feedback, allowing for revision can encourage student engagement and provide an opportunity for students to implement the suggested changes quickly, rather than waiting for the next assignment. Working with existing drafts instead of starting from scratch for each writing assignment can help students maintain momentum, focus their efforts on specific objectives, and build up to "final draft" quality over time.

Ready-to-Use Resources

Templates

Reflection and Revision Form

A reflection template to support students in revising their writing. The cover sheet allows students to reflect on completed drafts and provides space for teacher feedback.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Writing · 1 pages


Templates

Guided Reflection and Revision Form

A reflection template to support students in revising their writing. This version contains sentence frames to provide students with additional support.The cover sheet allows students to reflect on completed drafts and provides space for teacher feedback.

Grade 6, 7, 8 · Writing · 1 pages


Writing Checklist

Checklist for Reflection and Revision

A reflection template to support students in revising their writing. This version contains checklists to provide students with additional support.The cover sheet allows students to reflect on completed drafts and provides space for teacher feedback.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 · Writing · 1 pages


Templates

Teacher Feedback Form for Draft Revising

A feedback form for teachers to give input before students make revisions to their drafts.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Writing · 1 pages


Implementation Tips

Teacher Modeling How to Revise Student Work
Model a new writing strategy using a student's draft. Incorporating student work into direct instruction can promote buy-in and give tangible examples of writing and revision strategies. Teachers can strategically select which work to use in their lesson, considering students' personalities, learning needs, and writing content. It is helpful to check in with students prior to the lesson, requesting their permission to use their work, and explaining that the lesson will share tips for improving their work even more.
Developing Students' Growth Mindset
Frame revision positively and encourage students to see their writing assignments as ongoing and always improving. It may be helpful to read about famous authors' writing processes and discuss how all published writing goes through multiple drafts and iterations.
Opportunity for a New Grade
Consider revising students' grades as they revise their assignments. This can motivate students to seek and incorporate feedback, and provide additional opportunities for students to demonstrate growth toward an objective. Expectations for revision should be clear and promote accountability, adherence to deadlines, and attention to rubrics and project descriptions.
Digital Tools
When possible, have students draft writing on computers. Revision is less daunting when students can use digital tools. Programs like [[https://drive.google.com|GoogleDrive]] allow students and teachers to revisit previous drafts using the "See revision history" feature, creating opportunities to track progress over time. If access to computers isn't available, have students highlight their additions and revisions in each draft they submit. This guides the reader's focus to the parts the student focused on improving, and can expedite reading, grading, and giving feedback.

Examples

Multiple Revisions
When teaching descriptive language, have students work with the same draft over time. First students may focus on word choice, then adding figurative language, then sensory details. When planning, teachers may build in these "sub-assignments" as components of a larger, summative assessment. Giving students feedback after each addition to their writing can help guide more students to success with the final assignment.
Targeted Revision Practice
Create a draft of an expository writing assignment and share it with the class. Students can practice formulating claims, supporting ideas with evidence, and crafting clear explanations using the contents of the draft as a springboard. This will help students focus on practicing the targeted skill (e.g., incorporating evidence) without getting distracted or delayed by other elements of the writing process. This is a helpful modification for English Language Learners and writers who struggle with organization and fluency.
Revising Early Work
Toward the end of the school year have students revisit a writing assignment from September or October. Encourage them to revise the piece to reflect what they've learned over the course of the year. This year-end assessment gives teachers data about which writing lessons "stuck" with students, and gives students perspective on how their writing has evolved and matured over time.

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