Strategy

Picture Story Telling

Comic Strips, Story Boards

UDL 5.1

Instead of producing a written paragraph or essay describing material that has been read, the student produces a visual story that captures the same elements that a written piece would require (e.g. details, evidence, sequencing of events, etc). These are useful alternatives for students who are more comfortable in expressing themselves in a visual and/or concrete manner. Comic strips, story boards and student-created books are types of picture story telling.

Ready-to-Use Resources

Templates

8-Box Story Boards

A set of 8-box story board templates to support students when producing a visual story. Includes story boards with and without lines for written responses. Students can use these templates when creating their own stories or summarizing a book or section they have read.

Grade K, 1, 2 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing · 2 pages


Templates

Beginning, Middle, End Story Boards

A set of story board templates to support students when producing a visual story. Includes story boards that are labeled “beginning,” “middle,” and “end” to assist students in organizing story events.Students can use these templates when creating their own stories or summarizing a book or section they have read.

Grade K, 1, 2 · Reading, Writing · 2 pages


Templates

3-Box Story Board Templates

A set of 3-box story board templates to support students when producing a visual story. Includes story boards with and without lines for written responses. Students can use these templates when creating their own stories or summarizing a book or section they have read.

Grade K, 1, 2 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing · 2 pages


Templates

Plot Diagram Story Board Templates

A set of story board templates to support students when producing a visual story. Story boards in this set include a plot diagram to help students organize key events. Students can use these templates when creating their own stories or summarizing a book or section they have read.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing · 3 pages


Implementation Tips

Partner Work
Students can work in collaborative pairs so that one contributes written input (e.g. dialog on comic strips) and the other illustrates or finds the pictures.
Chunking
Break a large assignment into smaller ones (e.g. Instead of three safety rules for a lab experiment, have students do four comic strip frames for one rule)
Print Images
For students who might have a difficult time drawing their own images, teachers can pre-print images for the student to sequence and/or add captions or additional graphic details. For example, images related to Columbus' journey to the Americas can be pre-printed and students can sequence them and then put them into a comic strip.

Examples

Social Studies
Create a picture book with five events on Columbus’ arrival in America in chronological order.
Science
Make a comic strip that describes at least three safety rules for lab experiments.
Language Arts
Create an eight frame storyboard describing the main characters of "Charlotte’s Web".

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