Strategy

Language-Based Games

UDL 5.2

In the classroom, language-based games such as Charades, Taboo and Memory can help support students who are learning English to increase communication skills and enhance core vocabulary. In some games, such as Memory, you can correspond English words to the Spanish counterparts. In addition, some language based games also support learning grammar and sentence structure.

Ready-to-Use Resources

Activity

Individual Word Games

Posters for word games and activities that students can do individually. Each poster includes a description of the activity as well as student tips.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 11, 12 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing · 2 pages


Activity

Small Group Word Games

Posters for word games that can be played by students in small groups. Each poster includes a description of how to play the game as well as student tips to master the game.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing · 2 pages


Activity

Whole Class Word Games

Posters for word games that can be played by the entire class. Each poster includes a description of how to play the game as well as student tips to master the game.

Grade 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing, Language · 5 pages


Implementation Tips

Center Time
Some teachers incorporate games during centers and have the students rotate to each of the centers during the class period.
Language-Based Games
While lots of common board/home games can be applied to the classroom. The games below are recommended for involving multiple means of access and engaging in deeper understandings of the word. * Balderdash / Fictionary: Students generate a real definition and one or more fake definitions in order to attempt to get their classmates to select the incorrect definition. Students are involved in creating plausible false definitions which make them think deeply about the words meaning and context. * Charades: Students pull a vocabulary word and then act out the word in the attempt to have teammates guess the word. In order to support students who might be nervous about acting spontaneously in front of the classroom, students can be paired up with all the words given out ahead of time. Students can plan and rehearse their charades in their pairs before performing in front of their teammates. * Pictionary: Involves students generating a graphic/symbolic representation and without speaking try to have their teammates guess the word. Similar to charades, students can be paired discuss how they are going to try to draw their word before doing it in front of their teammates.

Examples

Language Arts – ELL
Students play a game of Charades to enhance learning high frequency vocabulary (“Tier 2” words). Each student has an opportunity to act out the word as well as guess what word is being acted out.
Science
Students play a game of Memory that has pictures of different kinds of animals. On one of the cards is a picture of the animal and name of the animal in the student’s native language. On the other card is the picture of the animal and the name of the animal in English.
Math
In math, students play a game of Jeopardy in which the different categories are current mathematical concepts that the students are working on (e.g. area, perimeter, circumference). Students work in groups to solve the problem and respond with an answer out loud. A great [[ http://powerpointgames.wikispaces.com/space/showimage/Blank%20Jeopardy%20Template.ppt | customizable Jeopardy Powerpoint template ]] can be downloaded from [[ http://powerpointgames.wikispaces.com/ | powerpointgames.wikispaces.com ]]. More examples can be found at [[http://mathbits.com/MathBits/PPT/BasicMania.html | www.mathbits.com ]].

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