Strategy

Geoboard

Pinboard

UDL 2.5 UDL 5.2

A Geoboard is a manipulative used to explore basic concepts in geometry such as perimeter, area and the characteristics of triangles and other polygons. It consists of a physical board with a certain number equidistant pegs, around which students wrap rubber bands to create shapes. Geoboards allow students to explore different geometrical shapes, as well as concepts such as transformations and congruence.

Ready-to-Use Resources

Task Cards

Geoboard Task Cards (Level 1): Simple Shapes

A set of task cards to instruct students how to create simple shapes using a geoboard. Includes a set of task cards with picture models to provide more support to student with following the directions. Level 1 cards have been aligned to grades K-2.

Grade K, 1, 2 · Math · 7 pages


Task Cards

Geoboard Task Cards (Level 2): Quadrilaterals and Angles

A set of task cards to instruct students how to create quadrilaterals and various triangles using a geoboard. Includes a set of task cards with picture models to provide more support to student with following the directions. Level 2 cards have been aligned to grades 3 and 4.

Grade 3, 4 · Math · 7 pages


Task Cards

Geoboard Task Cards (Level 3): Parallelograms and Congruent Shapes

A set of task cards to instruct students how to create parallelograms and congruent shapes using a geoboard. Includes a set of task cards with picture models to provide more support to student with following the directions. Level 3 cards have been aligned to grades 4, 5 and 6.

Grade 4, 5, 6 · Math · 7 pages


Implementation Tips

Using Models
Provide a model (e.g., a Geoboard with the desired pattern, sample image, etc.) for students who are unable to follow oral or written directions. Students can then use these models to construct the shape on their own.
Geoboards on Paper
Allow students who are unable to physically manipulate the rubber bands to draw figures on a paper-based Geoboard (i.e., dot paper). Here are some printable Geoboards:
[[http://lrt.ednet.ns.ca/PD/BLM/pdf_files/geoboards/geoboard_5x5.pdf|5x5 Geoboard]]
[[http://lrt.ednet.ns.ca/PD/BLM/pdf_files/geoboards/intermediate_geoboard11x11.pdf|11x11 Geoboard]]
[[http://lrt.ednet.ns.ca/PD/BLM/pdf_files/geoboards/small_geoboards4.pdf|Small Geoboards]]
Developing Fine Motor Skills
Use Geoboards to build fine-motor and coordination skills or as a calming strategy/sensory break for particular students. For example, a teacher can allow a student to use a Geoboard as an opportunity to engage their fingers/hands in a quick warm-up exercise (e.g., before independent writing). A teacher can also offer the Geoboard to a student as an option when taking a sensory break.
Digital and Online Geoboards
Have students practice using a Geoboard on a computer or device using the [[ https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/geoboard-by-math-learning/id519896952?mt=8| Geoboard ]] an app by the Math Learning Center.

Examples

Creating Shapes
During math centers, a teacher provides small visual shape cards or cards with shape descriptions (e.g., “Make a shape with 3 sides”, “Construct a pentagon”, “Create a 5 sided polygon”). Students use Geoboards to construct the shapes described using rubber bands. After each shape is constructed, students share the solution with a partner and discuss whether it includes the required features.
Justifying Solutions
A teacher provides pairs with Geoboards that have a shape constructed on them. The teacher challenges students to determine how to divide their shape into two equal halves. Students then use graph paper to illustrate their answer and use math skills to justify their solution (i.e., demonstrate that the two new shapes have the same area, highlight line of symmetry, etc). When all groups are done, students rotate around the room to review and discuss each other’s work.
Promoting Student Inquiry
A teacher displays a 5-by-5 array formed on a Geoboard and asks, “How many pegs are there? How do you know without counting one-by-one?” As students respond, the teacher prompts them to explain their problem-solving methods and make connections between multiplication facts and array formations. The teacher then challenges students with additional inquiry-based questions (e.g., How many squares can you make on a 5x5 Geoboard? What's the largest shape you can make? What's the smallest shape you can make? What do all the shapes you made have in common?) and students work with partners to explore solutions.

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