Strategy

Exit Tickets

Closure Activity, Ticket Out the Door, Exit Slip, Quick Assessment

Exit Tickets are brief formative assessments that gauge students’ understanding of a concept or topic at the end of a class or session. Exit Tickets include short prompts or tasks (e.g., short quiz, interest survey, partner activity, etc.) that can be completed by students in written, verbal or interactive forms. When completing Exit Tickets, students process and reflect on information learned, summarize key ideas, and apply their knowledge. In addition, Exit Tickets provide important feedback on student understanding that guides instructional decision-making and helps teachers determine lesson pacing and areas for reteaching.

Ready-to-Use Resources

Exit Ticket

Collaboration Skills: Reflection Exit Ticket

An exit ticket that helps students reflect on their collaborative skills and identify strengths and areas for improvement.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Behavior & SEL · 1 pages


Exit Ticket

Emoji Exit Tickets

These exit tickets were designed with UDL in mind. The top section gauges student engagement. The bottom three questions are aligned to the UDL principles of Engagement, Representation, and Action + Expression.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing, Math · 1 pages


Exit Ticket

Facebook Exit Tickets

Have students explain what they “liked” about today’s lesson. This is an easy, fun way to keep a positive and affirmative focus on students’ comments.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing, Math · 1 pages


Exit Ticket

Instagram Exit Tickets

Have students create a caption about today’s lesson. You can insert your own image(s) that are related to the lesson — or have students draw a picture. This is an engaging method for visual learners. After completing this exit ticket, you can create a gallery and have students comment on each others’ posts.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · English Language Arts, Reading, Writing, Math · 1 pages


Exit Ticket

Listening Skills: Reflection Exit Ticket

An exit ticket that helps students reflect on their listening skills and identify strengths and areas for improvement.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Behavior & SEL · 1 pages


Exit Ticket

Positive Communication: Reflection Exit Ticket

An exit ticket that helps students reflect on their positive communication skills and identify strengths and areas for improvement.

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Behavior & SEL · 1 pages


Exit Ticket

Twitter Exit Tickets

Have students leave a concluding “Tweet” — or brief thought — for the lesson. Encourage them to use #hashtags (a word or unspaced phrase) to idenify common themes or content from the lesson. Then, when reviewing the lesson the next day, you can share which words or themes were “trending.”

Grade 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 · Reading, Writing, Math · 1 pages


Implementation Tips

Meaningful Prompts
Choose Exit Ticket prompts that encourage students to reflect on new content and provide information to guide future instruction. Meaningful Exit Tickets ask students to make real-world connections, solve a problem, or share their opinions.
Keep it Short and Simple
Provide students with a short prompt that can completed in less than five minutes. The prompt is meant to provide closure to the lesson and should be meaningful, but not overly demanding. Keeping Exit Tickets short and simple reduces student anxiety and the risk of students not completing the ticket in order to leave class more quickly.
Varying Student Responses
Provide opportunities for students to complete Exit Tickets in various forms. Exit Tickets can be completed on small sheets of paper, packets, sticky notes, or journals and can include written and illustrated responses. Students can also simply respond to questions verbally. Teachers can also have students work in cooperative groups to complete exit tickets.
Establishing Routine
Establish and practice routines for Exit Tickets (e.g., prompt put on board, take out Exit Ticket packet when teacher says, “Ticket Time!”, etc.). Students should also know what to do when they finish their Exit Ticket (e.g., make up their own problem, pack up and put ticket in box by the door, etc.). By reinforcing expectations, Exit Tickets will become a routine and productive part of class.
Review Results and Adjust Instruction
Review Exit Tickets as soon as possible to evaluate student learning. A quick way to analyze Exit Tickets is by dividing student forms into three categories: Understands, Somewhat Understands, Does Not Understand. Closely review the forms in the “Does Not Understand” group to determine why concepts were misunderstood and use this information to determine how to reteach the next day. If only a small group of students struggled in a particular area, find a time the next day to meet with the group to clarify misunderstandings and provide additional opportunities for student practice. If all or most of the class did not fully grasp the concept, start the next day’s lesson with a ten minute review and reinforcement task.
Technology Integration
Consider using technology for interactive Exit Tickets. Web-based programs allow students to use mobile devices to respond to questions. These programs and others also create instant, graphic displays of responses that the teacher and class can review.
Free Technology Resources:
[[https://www.plickers.com/|Plickers]]
[[http://www.socrative.com/|Socrative]]
[[https://kahoot.it|Kahoot]]
[[https://www.polleverywhere.com/classroom-response-system|Poll Everywhere]]
[[https://www.edmodo.com/|Edmodo]]
[[https://todaysmeet.com/|Today's Meet]]

Examples

Gauging Student Interest with Exit Tickets
After a lesson on the Bill of Rights, a teacher asks students to write on a sticky note which amendment stood out to them and why. Students hand the sticky note to the teacher on the way out of the classroom as a dismissal ticket. The teacher reviews the notes to evaluate overall student understanding of the topic and then forms groups based on the amendment selected by each student. The next day, the teacher introduces a project where students will work in these groups to investigate the impact of the selected amendment and how it affects today’s society.
Integrating Technology
As an alternative to a paper-and-pencil Exit Ticket, a teacher develops a five question quiz using an online student response system (e.g., [[https://getkahoot.com/how-it-works|Kahoot]], [[http://www.socrative.com/pricing.php|Socrative]], [[https://www.polleverywhere.com/classroom-response-system|Poll Everywhere]], etc.). Following the lesson, the teacher asks students to form pairs and either use their phones or classroom computers to complete the quiz. As students submit answers, the teacher projects the results for the class to view and encourages students to try to answer as many correctly as possible. This interactive, game-based approach to Exit Tickets provides the teacher with real-time feedback on student understanding of the concepts while also providing an engaging method of review and reinforcement for students.
Reviewing Important Concepts
To assist students in reviewing key concepts at the end of a unit on animal adaptations, a teacher writes the following question on the board: What are some ways animals adapt to their environment? Students brainstorm ideas in small groups for a couple minutes. Then, the teacher encourages students to “popcorn share” their answers (i.e., individual students voluntarily stand and briefly share an idea). After several students have shared, all students write a response to the question in their science journals. Each student shows their written response to the teacher as they walk out of the door.

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