Use Evidence to Answer a Question

By (date), when asked a who, what, where or when question about a familiar informational text, (name) will choose the answer (e.g. by pointing, stating, using eye gaze) from (3) explicit textual details, for (3 out of 3) informational text analyses. Example text: Wild Horses by George Edward Stanley Example question: Where do the wild... horses live? Example explicit details: 1. You can see them running free in Colorado, Nevada, and Wyoming. 2. The horses made hunting easier. 3. The wild horses are called mustangs. Example student responses: The student points to detail 1; the student says, "Colorado, Nevada and Wyoming."; the student uses eye gaze to select detail 1.
  • By (date), when asked a who, what, where or when question about a preferred informational text, (name) will choose the answer (e.g. by pointing, stating, using eye gaze) from (3) explicit textual details, for (3 out of 3) informational text analyses.
  • By (date), when asked a who, what, where or when question about a familiar informational text, (name) will choose the answer (e.g. by stating, pointing) from (3) adapted (e.g. enlarged, tactile) explicit textual details that are read aloud by the teacher, for (3 out of 3) informational text analyses.
  • By (date), when asked a who, what, where or when question about a familiar informational text with a hearing support adaptation (e.g. FM unit, voice-to-text technology, preferential seating), (name) will choose the answer (e.g. by pointing, stating, using eye gaze) from (3) written explicit textual details, for (3 out of 3) informational text analyses.
  • By (date), when asked a who, what, where or when question about a familiar informational text, (name) will choose the answer (e.g. through spoken words, a communication device, purposeful gestures) from (2) enlarged explicit textual details, for (3 out of 3) informational text analyses.
  • By (date), when asked a who, what, where or when question about a familiar informational text, (name) will choose the answer (e.g. by pointing, using an eye gaze board or communication device) from (2) enlarged written and/or illustrated explicit textual details, for (3 out of 3) informational text analyses.

UDL-Aligned Strategies About UDL

  • Optimize individual choice and autonomy
    When a student needs additional support to stay engaged throughout an academic task, using a preferred text can help him or her focus. If teachers cannot give students free reign to choose a text, they can consider allowing them to make a decision between three or four options that are more closely related to the curriculum. Even if the options aren't necessarily something the student may have chosen on his or her own, choice gives the learner a sense of ownership over the assignment.
  • UDL II 4.1 Vary the methods for response and navigation
    Expressive language difficulties can make it hard for students to verbally explain an answer. Instead, teachers can give them alternative options in regard to expression: for example, they can use a communication device, an eye gaze board, or gesture toward a written answer. In relation to this specific goal, teachers can also supplement written material with illustrations to support understanding. Although methods of expression may vary from student to student, diverse learners who respond in diverse ways can all demonstrate mastery.
  • UDL I 1.1 Offer ways of customizing the display of information
    Students who need visual support adaptations may have difficulty reading and comprehending written information presented during this task. Therefore, it is imperative that these students are given an adapted text to ensure access to the assigned material. Teachers can enlarge the text, physically change the text (by using braille), or support a read aloud with tactile "illustrations." For example, the teacher can supply the students with small models of horses that the students can touch during a read aloud of the text Wild Horses by George Edward Stanley.

You must sign in to save this goal.

DLM Essential Elements

ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1
Key Ideas and Details
EE.RI.9-10.1 Determine which citations demonstrate what the text says explicitly as well as inferentially.
ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1
Key Ideas and Details
EE.RI.11-12.1 Analyze a text to determine its meaning and cite textual evidence to support explicit and implicit understanding.

NCSC Core Connectors

ELA-Literacy.910.RI.b2
Reading Standards for Informational Text
910.RI.b2 Determine which piece(s) of evidence provide the strongest support for inferences, conclusions, or summaries in a text.
ELA-Literacy.1112.RI.b2
Reading Standards for Informational Text
1112.RI.b2 Determine which piece(s) of evidence provide the strongest support for inferences, conclusions, or summaries in a text.

Standards

RI.9-10.1 Key Ideas and Details
RI.9-10.1 Key Ideas and Details
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
RI.11-12.1 Key Ideas and Details
RI.11-12.1 Key Ideas and Details
Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Referenced Strategies

  • Adapted Text

    Adapted text is any text that has been changed from its original print format. This includes a variety of strategies to make traditional tex...

  • Multiple Representations

    Multiple representations allow students to see the same mathematical expression or mathematical relationship presented in more than one form...

  • Online Tools

    Educational websites and apps can support student engagement and provide individualized practice spaces to work on academic skills. Teachers...

  • Preferred Topic or Text

    Allowing students to select a preferred topic or text for a project increases engagement and balances the cognitive load when students are l...

  • Read Aloud

    Read Aloud refers to presenting written text in an auditory format. The teacher can read aloud to the class or students can take turns readi...

  • Picture Choices

    A type of communication that allows students to respond using a picture, symbol, or illustration. Picture choices can be used for multiple c...

  • Oral Presentation

    Oral presentations provide an alternative to written language. Students may answer questions from a teacher or peer in an interview format, ...

  • Familiar Text

    Teachers may provide a previously-taught book or passage as a practice text when students are learning a new skill. Using a familiar text cr...