Narrating a Sequence of Events

By (date), when given a sequence of events, (name) will write a (5) sentence paragraph that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using (5) temporal words (e.g. first, next,... before), (2) description sentences (e.g. describing actions, feelings, and thoughts), (1) conclusion sentence and (1) illustration of the event scoring (5 out of 6) on a teacher-made rubric in (2 out of 3) trials.
  • By (date), when given a sequence of events, (name) will fill in a partially-completed paragraph template to use as a guide for writing a (5) sentence paragraph that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using (5) temporal words (e.g. first, next, before), (2) description sentences (e.g. describing actions, feelings, and thoughts), (1) conclusion sentence and (1) illustration of the event scoring (5 out of 6) on a teacher-made rubric in (2 out of 3) trials.
  • By (date), when given a sequence of events, (name) will work with peers to create an illustrated diagram to use as a guide for writing a (3) sentence paragraph that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using (3) temporal words (e.g. first, next, before), (1) description sentence (e.g. describing actions, feelings, and thoughts) and (1) conclusion sentence scoring (4 out of 6) on a teacher-made rubric in (2 out of 3) trials.
  • By (date), viewing an illustrated storybook showing a sequence of events, (name) will construct a illustrated diagram of the experience's details, character feelings, and actions in the correct sequence in (2 out of 3) performances as measured by a teacher-made rubric.

UDL Strategies About UDL

  • UDL I 2.5 Illustrate through multiple media
    Instead of having a student read text, teachers can present students a sequence of events through images or a video. Students can identify and describe the sequence of events on a diagram that correlates to the video or images.
  • UDL II 5.1 Use multiple media for communication
    After interacting with a text, teachers can assign roles to each student and have students "pair share" a sequence of events. Teachers can also provide students with prompts to guide students in using temporal words, feelings, thoughts and response to the actions that occurred throughout their pair share.
  • Optimize relevance, value, and authenticity
    Teachers can have students post their completed work around the classroom for display. When the works are posted, teachers can guide students in a learning walk where students follow the teacher in a walk around the room observing their peers' work. Teachers can have students share their opinions on the pieces they liked the best.

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Common Core Standards

2.W.3 Text Types and Purposes
2.W.3 Text Types and Purposes
Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

Standard Staircase

Writing and Drawing to Narrate an Event

By (date), after a teacher asks (name) to tell about a special day that he/she remembers, (name) will write using pre-phonetic knowledge (e.g. frs = first), draw illustrations, and sequentially narrate the event, for (4 out of 5) trials, as measured by (student work samples).

Narrating a Single Event

By (date), when given an event, (name) will write (1) complete sentence describing a detail in the event, verbally state a reaction to the event and create (1) picture that illustrates the event in (4 out of 5 trials) as measured by (student work samples).

Writing and Drawing to Narrate an Event

By (date), after a teacher asks (name) to tell about a special day that he/she remembers, (name) will write using pre-phonetic knowledge (e.g. frs = first), draw illustrations, and sequentially narrate the event, for (4 out of 5) trials, as measured by (student work samples).

Develop Efficient Pencil Grasp

By (date), when given paper and drawing utensils during a coloring activity of at least (5) minutes, (name) will use a grasp that allows him or her to make marks by freely moving thumb and fingers and refrain from using less mature or inefficient grasp (e.g. in a closed fist, in stiff extended fingers, tightly squeezed with thumb against hand), in (3 out of 5) coloring activities.

Narrating Two or More Events

By (date), when given two or more events, (name) will create a (3) sentence paragraph that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using (3) temporal words (e.g. first, next, before), (1) conclusion sentence and (1) illustration that supports the event described in (4 out of 5 trials) as measured by (student work samples).

Develop Efficient Pencil Grasp

By (date), when given paper and drawing utensils during a coloring activity of at least (5) minutes, (name) will use a grasp that allows him or her to make marks by freely moving thumb and fingers and refrain from using less mature or inefficient grasp (e.g. in a closed fist, in stiff extended fingers, tightly squeezed with thumb against hand), in (3 out of 5) coloring activities.

Use Efficient Pencil Grasp

By (date), when given paper and writing utensils during a writing assignment of at least (3) sentences, (name) will use a grasp that allows him or her to write by moving thumb and fingers freely and refrain from using less mature or inefficient patterns (e.g. in stiff extended fingers, tightly squeezed with thumb against hand), for (5 out of 5) writing assignments.

Narrating a Sequence of Events Current Goal

By (date), when given a sequence of events, (name) will write a (5) sentence paragraph that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using (5) temporal words (e.g. first, next, before), (2) description sentences (e.g. describing actions, feelings, and thoughts), (1) conclusion sentence and (1) illustration of the event scoring (5 out of 6) on a teacher-made rubric in (2 out of 3) trials.

Combining Sentences with Joining Words

By (date), after a teacher cuts (2) descriptive sentence strips (e.g. "He is an amazing acrobat." "He can do fantastic flips.") into individual words and the class participates in a shared language activity using a variety of combining words (e.g. "and" "who" or "that") to join the (2) sentences to make (1) sentence (e.g. "He is an amazing acrobat who can do fantastic flips."), (name) will cut (2) descriptive sentences and reorganize and glue to create (1) new sentence using a variety of combining words and/or dropping words when necessary for (4 out of 5) sets of sentences for (3 out of 4) sentence combining activities.

Word Spacing

By (date), when given a writing assignment, (name) will write (2) paragraphs of at least (5) sentences each with not more than (2) instances of too much or too little space between words (e.g. large space looks like it is an empty blank for a missing word, or the reader can not easily distinguish where words start and end) for (4 out of 5) written assignments.

Left Margin Orientation

By (date), when given a writing assignment, (name) will write (1) paragraph of at least (5) sentences with no lines starting more than (¼”) from the left margin (4 out of 5) written assignments.

Stabilize Paper

By (date), when given a writing assignment of at least (2) two paragraphs of at least (5) sentences each, (name) will use his or her non-dominant hand to stabilize the paper as needed for the entire duration of the assignment for (5 out of 5) assignments.

Spacing Within Words

By (date), when given a writing assignment, (name) will write a paragraph of at least (5) sentences with not more than (1) word in which there is too much or too little space (i.e. letters are touching or there is so much space that there is confusion about a word break within the word) between letters (4 out of 5) written assignments.

Use Efficient Pencil Grasp

By (date), when given paper and writing utensils during a writing assignment of at least (3) sentences, (name) will use a grasp that allows him or her to write by moving thumb and fingers freely and refrain from using less mature or inefficient patterns (e.g. in stiff extended fingers, tightly squeezed with thumb against hand), for (5 out of 5) writing assignments.

Narrating an Experience

By (date), when given a real or imagined event, (name) will create a (5) sentence narrative piece that includes at least (2) characters with (1) character description sentence per character (e.g. describing characters's feeling and thoughts), (3) temporal words (e.g. first, next, before) and (1) conclusion sentence scoring (5 out of 6) on a teacher-made rubric in (2 out of 3) trials.

Developing Writer’s Craft in a Narrative

By (date), after given a personal narrative prompt (e.g. “Write about a memorable holiday”) and completing a graphic organizer (e.g. Sensory Detail Chart: “What you… Saw, Heard, Smelt, Felt, Said”) to brainstorm and organize ideas, (name) will write an (8-10) sentence personal narrative including: a (1) sentence introduction, (3) temporal transition words (e.g. first, next, last) to signal a clear sequence of events, at least (3) examples of writer’s craft (e.g. sensory details, descriptive words, figurative language, or dialogue), and a (1) sentence concluding statement in (4 out of 5) writing exercises.

Use Efficient Pencil Grasp

By (date), when given paper and writing utensils during a writing assignment of at least (3) sentences, (name) will use a grasp that allows him or her to write by moving thumb and fingers freely and refrain from using less mature or inefficient patterns (e.g. in stiff extended fingers, tightly squeezed with thumb against hand), for (5 out of 5) writing assignments.

Narrating an Experience

By (date), when given a real or imagined event, (name) will create a (5) sentence narrative piece that includes at least (2) characters with (1) character description sentence per character, (3) transition phrases, (3) concrete phrases describing sequence and sensory details, and (1) conclusion sentence scoring (5 out of 6) on a teacher-made rubric in (2 out of 3) trials.

Narrating an Experience

By (date), when given real or imagined events, (name) will create a narrative piece that uses dialogue, descriptions, pacing and character responses to situations; includes transitions and sensory details and ends with a conclusion that follows the narration in (4 out of 5) trials as measured by teacher-created rubric.

Using Sensory Details to Develop Setting

By (date), (name) will use sensory specific language to development the setting of a (500-word) narrative, using detailed descriptions that address the setting through each of the five senses and (5) metaphors or similes, for (3 out of 4) trials.

Referenced Strategies

  • Cooperative Learning

    Cooperative Learning is when students are given opportunities to approach learning activities in peer groups, usually in teams of four where...

  • Adapted Text

    Adapted text is any text that has been changed from its original print format. This includes a variety of strategies to make traditional tex...

  • Illustration

    As an alternative to written or verbal language, students are given the option of producing image-based class work, projects or tests. Commo...

  • Graphic Organizers

    Graphic Organizers are visual representations of text. They can be used to organize facts and/or specific features of fiction or non-fiction...

  • Picture Story Telling

    Instead of producing a written paragraph or essay describing material that has been read, the student produces a visual story that captures ...

  • Reference Materials

    Reference materials are resources that a student can use when completing academic or social and emotional learning tasks. These materials pr...

  • Video

    Using video in the classroom brings a non-print, audio-visual-accessible form of content to students. Video can enhance content and concepts...

  • Word Bank

    A word bank is a list of words that is created by the teacher or student that relates to the core content and academic material the student ...