Narrating a sequence of events

By (date), when given a sequence of events, (name) will create a written piece that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using temporal words (first, next, before), describes actions, feelings, and... thoughts and (name) will provide a sense of closure to what happened and a picture that supports the event described in (4 out of 5 trials or 80% accuracy) as measured by (student work samples).
  • Given a sequence of events, students will fill in a partially completed outline that students will use as a guide for creating an narrative piece that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using temporal words (first, next, before), describes actions, feelings, and thoughts and (name) will provide a sense of closure to what happened in (2 out of 3 written pieces).
  • Given a sequence of events, instead of writing, students can pair share details of each event and work with a peer to create an illustrated storybook that students will use as a guide for creating a narrative piece that recounts the events in the order that they occurred and provide a reaction to what happened in each event in (2 out of 3 written pieces).
  • After viewing an illustrated storybook showing a sequence of events, students will construct a diagram that shows the events in the sequence that each happened in (2 out of 3 sequence activities).

UDL Strategies About UDL

  • UDL I 2.5 Illustrate through multiple media
    Instead of reading grade level text, teachers can present students a sequence of events through images or a video. Students can identify and describe the sequence of events on a diagram that correlates to the video or images.
  • UDL II 5.1 Use multiple media for communication
    After interacting with a text, teachers can assign roles to each student and have students pair share a sequence of events. Teachers can also provide students with prompts to guide students in using temporal words, feelings, thoughts and response to the actions that occurred throughout their pair share.
  • Optimize relevance, value, and authenticity
    Teachers can have students post their completed work around the classroom for display. When all the works are posted teachers can guide students in a learning walk: where all students follow the teacher in a walk around the room observing their peers' work . Teachers can have students share out their opinions on the pieces they liked the best.

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Common Core Standards

2.W.3 Text Types and Purposes
Write narratives in which they recount a well-elaborated event or short sequence of events, include details to describe actions, thoughts, and feelings, use temporal words to signal event order, and provide a sense of closure.

Staircase Goals

Narrating a single event

By (date), when given an event, (name) will create a piece that tells about the event's details in the order they occurred and (name) will provide a reaction to what happened and a picture that supports the event described in (4 out of 5 trials or 80% accuracy) as measured by (student work samples).

Writing and Drawing to Narrate an Event

By (date), after a teacher asks (name) to tell about a special day that he/she remembers, (name) will write using pre-phonetic knowledge (e.g. frs = first), draw illustrations, and sequentially narrate the event, for (4 out of 5) trials, as measured by (student work samples).

Narrating two or more events

By (date), when given two or more events, (name) will create a piece that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using temporal words (first, next, before) and (name) will provide a sense of closure to what happened and a picture that supports the event described in (4 out of 5 trials or 80% accuracy) as measured by (student work samples).

Narrating a sequence of events Current Goal

By (date), when given a sequence of events, (name) will create a written piece that tells about each event's details in the order they occurred using temporal words (first, next, before), describes actions, feelings, and thoughts and (name) will provide a sense of closure to what happened and a picture that supports the event described in (4 out of 5 trials or 80% accuracy) as measured by (student work samples).

Combining Sentences with Joining Words

By (date), after a teacher cuts (2) descriptive sentence strips (e.g. "He is an amazing acrobat." "He can do fantastic flips.") into individual words and the class participates in a shared language activity using a variety of combining words (e.g. "and" "who" or "that") to join the (2) sentences to make (1) sentence (e.g. "He is an amazing acrobat who can do fantastic flips."), (name) will cut (2) descriptive sentences and reorganize and glue to create (1) new sentence using a variety of combining words and/or dropping words when necessary for (4 out of 5) sets of sentences for (3 out of 4) sentence combining activities.

Narrating an experience

By (date), when given a real or imagined experience, (name) will create a piece that uses dialogue and characters to describe details in the order they occurred using temporal words (e.g. first, next, before), describes actions, feelings, and thoughts, and (name) will provide a sense of closure in (4 out of 5 trials or 80% accuracy) as measured by (student work samples).

Narrating an experience

By (date), when given a real or imagined events, (name) will create a narrative piece that uses dialogue and characters to sequence a story that unfolds naturally , describes character responses to situations, uses transition words and concrete words and phrases to describe sequence and sensory details, and ends with a conclusion that follows the narration in (4 out of 5 trials or 80% accuracy) as measured by (student work samples).

Narrating an experience

By (date), when given real or imagined events, (name) will create a narrative piece that uses dialogue, descriptions, pacing, and character responses to situations, includes transitions and sensory details, and ends with a conclusion that follows the narration in (4 out of 5 trials or 80% accuracy) as measured by (student work samples).

Using Sensory Details to Develop Setting

By (date), (name) will use sensory specific language to development the setting of a (500-word) narrative, using detailed descriptions that address the setting through each of the five senses and (5) metaphors or similes, for (3 out of 4) trials.

Referenced Strategies

  • Word Bank

    A word bank is a list of words that is created by the teacher or student that relates to the core content and academic material the student ...

  • Illustration

    As an alternative to written or verbal language, students are given the option of producing image-based class work, projects or tests. Commo...

  • Graphic Organizers

    Graphic Organizers are visual representations of text. They can be used to organize facts and/or specific features of fiction or non-fiction...