Key Details Supporting the Main Idea

By (date), after reading a grade level text, (name) will verbally identify the main idea, (3) key details, and describe in... (2-3) sentences how the key details support the main idea in (4 out of 5) trials as measured by teacher observation.
  • By (date), after reading a grade level text and taking notes with a graphic organizer , (name) will verbally identify the main idea, (3) key details, and describe in (2-3) sentences how the key details support the main idea in (4 out of 5) trials as measured by teacher observation.
  • By (date), after reading a text at (name)'s instructional level , and highlighting key details with a peer/tutor, (name) will verbally identify the main idea, (3) key details, and describe in (2-3) sentences how the key details support the main idea in (4 out of 5) trials as measured by teacher observation.
  • By (date), after listening to a text at (name)'s instructional level with the key details and main ideas highlighted , (name) will identify the main idea, (1) key detail (by eye gaze or an AC device), and describe in (2-3) phrases how the key detail supports the main idea (verbally or with an AC device) in (4 out of 5) trials as measured by teacher observation.

UDL Strategies About UDL

  • UDL I 2.1 Clarify vocabulary and symbols
    Instead of students reading the text, then extrapolating the main idea and key details on their own, teachers could read the text with the students . As they read together, teachers can help students highlight main ideas and key details.
  • UDL II 5.3 Build fluencies with graduated levels of support for practice and performance
    Instead of students completing this task with instructional level material each time, students may benefit from practicing with text below their instructional level. This will allow them to learn the skill of identifying the main idea with supporting details without the added difficulty of comprehending challenging text. Over time, teachers should gradually increase the difficulty of the text.
  • Optimize relevance, value, and authenticity
    Instead of students reading an informational text from a standard textbook, teachers can select texts that are culturally responsive. For example, if this skill is being taught in January, the topic could be civil rights or Martin Luther King Jr.

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Common Core Standards

3.RI.2 Key Ideas and Details
Determine the main idea of a text; recount the key details and explain how they support the main idea.

Staircase Goals

Identify Main Idea in Read Alouds

By (date), when grade-level text is read aloud, (name) will verbally explain the main topic and retell (2) key details in (4 out of 5) trials as measured by teacher observation.

Main Topic and Retell Key Details

By (date), after reading grade level text, (name) will write 2-4 sentences describing the main idea and (3) key details in the text as measured by (teacher made rubrics and student work samples).

Main Ideas in a Multi-Paragraph Text

By (date), when given a multi-paragraph, grade level text, (name) will write (3-5 sentences) identifying the main idea of the text and the main topic of each paragraph with in (4 out of 5 trials) as measured by a (teacher-made rubric).

Key Details Supporting the Main Idea Current Goal

By (date), after reading a grade level text, (name) will verbally identify the main idea, (3) key details, and describe in (2-3) sentences how the key details support the main idea in (4 out of 5) trials as measured by teacher observation.

Infer a Main Idea from Informational Text

By (date), after reading a grade level informational article with the main idea (e.g. topic sentence, topic paragraph, title, headings) removed, (name) will infer and verbally state the main idea using (1) complete sentence in (2 out of 3) trials as measured by teacher observation.

Summarize Text with Main Idea, Key Details

By (date), after reading a grade level text, (name) will write a summary of the text in (3-5 sentences) including the main idea, and an explanation of how (2) key details support the main idea as measured by a (teacher-made rubric).

Infer a Main Idea from Informational Text

By (date), after reading a grade level informational article with the main idea (e.g. topic sentence, topic paragraph, title, headings) removed, (name) will infer and verbally state the main idea using (1) complete sentence in (2 out of 3) trials as measured by teacher observation.

Summarize Text with Multiple Main Ideas

By (date), after reading a grade level text, (name) will write a summary of the text discussing (2) main ideas, and an explanation of how (2) key details support each main idea with (80% accuracy) as measured by a (teacher-made rubric).

Infer a Main Idea from Informational Text

By (date), after reading a grade level informational article with the main idea (e.g. topic sentence, topic paragraph, title, headings) removed, (name) will infer and verbally state the main idea using (1) complete sentence in (2 out of 3) trials as measured by teacher observation.

Determine Central Idea and Supporting Details

By (date), when given grade level text, (name) will write a summary of the text's central idea with (3) supporting details as measured by a (teacher created rubric).

Development of Multiple Central Ideas

By (date), when given grade level text, (name) will write a summary of (2) of the text's central ideas with (3) supporting details for each that explain how the central ideas develop over the course of the text as measured by a (teacher created rubric).

Analyze the Relationship Between Central Idea and Details

By (date), when given grade level text, (name) will write a summary about the central idea of the text and analyze how (3) supporting details develop the central idea as measured by (teacher created rubric).

Analyze the Central Idea of Informational Text

By (date), after reading a grade-level informational text, (name) will write an organized, focused essay of (150-300) words that includes an introductory paragraph containing the title of the text, its author, and a thesis statement that states the central idea of the text; (3) body paragraphs that reference and provide commentary on specific details from the text that support the thesis; (3) relevant direct citations from the text that support claims; and a conclusion that states the lesson the author relayed to the audience, whether the lesson is relevant to the audience, and justification for the choice for (3 out of 4) texts.

Analyze Central Theme of Informational Text

By (date), after reading a grade-level informational text, (name) will write an organized, focused essay of (150-300) words that includes an introductory paragraph containing the title of the text, its author, and a thesis statement that states (2) central ideas of the text that are developed; (2) body paragraphs that reference and provide commentary on specific instances in the text that support the themes mentioned in the thesis; (1) body paragraph that explains how the two central ideas interact and built upon each other; (4) relevant, direct citations from the text that support claims; and a conclusion that states the lessons the author relayed to the audience, whether the lessons are relevant to the audience, and justification for the choice for (3 out of 4) texts.

Referenced Strategies

  • Alternate Text

    Instead of modifying a grade level text, an alternate text about the same topic is provided to the student. Alternate texts could be an abri...

  • Read Aloud

    Read Aloud refers to presenting written text in an auditory format. The teacher can read aloud to the class or students can take turns readi...

  • Graphic Organizers

    Graphic Organizers are visual representations of text. They can be used to organize facts and/or specific features of fiction or non-fiction...

  • Highlighting

    Highlighting could include highlighting key words/phrases, key points or arguments or text structures such as headings. This adaptation can ...

  • Modified Text

    Modified text is grade level text that has been simplified to meet the instructional level and needs of the reader. It can involve altering ...