Ask Questions About a Text

By (date), after a read aloud of a nonfiction text, when verbally prompted by the teacher (e.g. Teacher says “Tell us about something important that we learned from the text.”), (name) will... verbally respond with (1) question or statement about the text (e.g. Student asks “I was wondering how bears know when to wake up from hibernation?”) during (3 out of 3) class discussions.
  • By (date), after a read aloud of a familiar nonfiction, when verbally prompted by the teacher (e.g. Teacher says “Tell us about something important that we learned from the text.”), (name) will verbally respond with (1) question or statement about the text (e.g. Student asks “I was wondering how bears know when to wake up from hibernation?”) during (3 out of 3) class discussions.
  • By (date), after a read aloud of a nonfiction text and when verbally prompted by the teacher (e.g. Teacher says “Tell us about something important that we learned from the text.”), (name) will use picture choices to verbally respond with (1) question or statement about the story (e.g. Student asks “I was wondering how bears know when to wake up from hibernation?”) during (3 out of 3) class discussions.
  • By (date), when participating in a reader’s theater performance of a familiar text on a preferred topic, (name) will perform the role of a character or narrator of the text, verbally providing at least (1) detail about the text during (2 out of 3) performances.

UDL-Aligned Strategies About UDL

  • Foster collaboration and communication
    Watching or participating in an informal production of a nonfiction text can support many students as they learn to discuss text and use details in their talk. Rather than only ask a student to recall and talk about the details from a book that has been read aloud, a teacher may involve the student as actor in recreating the book. Without being prompted to “talk” about the details, a student might recall and apply many details from the book in performance, without even realizing that they are being assessed. In time, the student can be clued in to her facility with details in performance, and could be transitioned into a more traditional method of “talking” about text. For example, after a few times of performing with classmates as characters from a favorite book, the teacher might say “Katherine, do you know that when you perform as the horse and talk about how your hooves protect your feet, you are sharing great information that we learn from the book?”.
  • UDL II 4.1 Vary the methods for response and navigation
    For some students, choosing from a narrow selection of illustrated picture choices to talk about can support their ability to talk about details from a text. Rather than receiving just a verbal prompt to discuss a text, a student can look at and choose from two or three pictures, which can help to activate his/her memory and provide clues from which to talk from. The pictures help to activate memory, while the narrow selection helps to minimize the student from becoming overwhelmed with decision. The teacher could simply have two pages from a book marked, and flip from mark to mark--”Would you like to talk about what was presented on this page, or (turning page) this page?”.
  • UDL I 2.3 Support decoding text, mathematical notation, and symbols
    Some students will have difficulty talking about details from a new text that has recently been read aloud. Reading a familiar or well-known book can support many students in learning to talk about books, particularly helping them remember and be ready to discuss details from the story. By removing the newness of a text, teachers can let their students focus on learning the skills of discussion, rather than remembering the details of the text. For example, if a student has heard the same read-aloud about starfish three times, they are more prepared to recall and share information that was learned from the text.

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Standards

RI.K.1 Key Ideas and Details
RI.K.1 Key Ideas and Details
With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

Standard Staircase

Ask Questions About a Text

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By (date), after a read aloud of a nonfiction text, when verbally prompted by the teacher (e.g. Teacher says “Tell us about something important that we learned from the text.”), (name) will verbally respond with (1) question or statement about the text (e.g. Student asks “I was wondering how bears know when to wake up from hibernation?”) during (3 out of 3) class discussions.

Identify Person from Familiar Text

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text with the teacher, listening to the teacher model (1) question and answer (e.g. “Who is the postal carrier? The postal carrier is the person who delivers mail to people’s homes.”), and when asked (1) question about a person, object, or place from the text, (name) will verbally answer the question, for (4 of 5) nonfiction reading sessions.

Use Characteristics to Identify Objects

By (date), given (3) objects that are verbally labeled by the teacher and asked to choose which object has a specific physical or performance characteristic, (name) will select the object, for (4 out of 5) object identification activities.

Answer Questions about Details in a Text

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text, when verbally prompted by the teacher (e.g. Teacher says “Tell about something important that you learned from the text.”), (name) will verbally respond with (1) question or statement about the text (e.g. Student asks “I was wondering how bears know when to wake up from hibernation?”) during (3 out of 3) text discussions.

Identify Person from Familiar Text

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text with the teacher, listening to the teacher model (1) question and answer (e.g. “Who is the postal carrier? The postal carrier is the person who delivers mail to people’s homes.”), and when asked (1) question about a person, object, or place from the text, (name) will verbally answer the question, for (4 of 5) nonfiction reading sessions.

Use Characteristics to Identify Objects

By (date), given (3) objects that are verbally labeled by the teacher and asked to choose which object has a specific physical or performance characteristic, (name) will select the object, for (4 out of 5) object identification activities.

Ask/Answer Questions About a Text

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text, when given a set of questions to answer for a small-group text discussion, (name) will verbally or in written form ask or answer at least (3) questions (e.g. Who, What, When, Why, Where, or How) about text details, during (3 of 3) reading sessions.

Identify Person from Familiar Text

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text with the teacher, listening to the teacher model (1) question and answer (e.g. “Who is the postal carrier? The postal carrier is the person who delivers mail to people’s homes.”), and when asked (1) question about a person, object, or place from the text, (name) will verbally answer the question, for (4 of 5) nonfiction reading sessions.

Use Characteristics to Identify Objects

By (date), given (3) objects that are verbally labeled by the teacher and asked to choose which object has a specific physical or performance characteristic, (name) will select the object, for (4 out of 5) object identification activities.

Refer to Textual Evidence

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text and asked a verbal question about what the text says explicitly, (name) will answer the question in writing by referring to (1) detail from the text in (4 out of 5) nonfiction texts.

Use Nonfiction Texts to Ask Questions

By (date) after reading a grade level nonfiction text (e.g. Titanic), (name) will identify (1) explicit key detail (e.g. People thought the Titanic was “unsinkable”) and (1) implicit key detail (e.g. Captain Smith did not expect the Titanic to have any difficulty sailing) and he/she will use these details to develop (2) questions; (1) factual question with a text reference (e.g. On what page did the text explain the reasons why the Titanic was called “unsinkable?”) and (1) inferential question with a text reference (e.g. “What clues in the text led you to believe Captain Smith was not prepared for an emergency?) in (4 out of 5) writing exercises.

Use Questions to Show Comprehension

By (date), after reading a grade level informational text and given a 2-column table labeled “Questions” and “Answers from Text,” (name) will develop (5) questions in the “Questions” column that demonstrate comprehension (e.g. “Which form of matter has a definite shape?”). (Name) will then trade tables with a peer, and use the text to answer (5) questions developed by the peer in the "Answers from Text" column. (Name) will demonstrate mastery in (4 out 5) trials as measured by questions and responses.

Answer Questions Based on a Text

By (date), immediately after reading a instructional-level text (e.g. graphic novel) of his/her choice, (name) will verbally answer at least (3) WH- questions (e.g. who, what, when, where), provided with the text, with no more than (1) sentence frame per question (e.g. Teacher says "The girl went to the..."), in (4 of 5) reading opportunities.

Understands Stories Read in Class

By (date), after a reader's theater of a story in class, (name) will demonstrate understanding of the story by role playing or acting out the answer for (2) comprehension questions (e.g. "What happens to the main character at the beginning of the story?") for (2 out of 3) stories.

Use Text Details to Make Inferences

By (date), when given a (3-4) paragraph of grade level informational passage (e.g. a science article from National Geographic Kids, (student) will infer the main purpose of the passage, write (2-3) sentences about the main purpose, and underline (3-4) examples and details from text that were used to infer the main purpose, for (2 out of 3) passages for (4 out of 4) inference identifying exercises.

Use Textual Evidence to Support Inferences and Conclusions

By (date), after reading a grade-level, nonfiction text (e.g. a biography of Abraham Lincoln), when given an inference-analysis prompt (e.g. "Use two details from the text to explain how Abraham Lincoln was an honest man."), (name) will write a (3-5) sentence paragraph stating (2) details from the text and explaining how the details support his/her understanding of the inference in (5 out of 5) inference-analysis opportunities.

Refer to Textual Evidence

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text and given a verbal claim about that text, (name) will support the claim by referring to (2) details in writing from the text for (4 out of 5) nonfiction texts.

Answer Questions Based on a Text

By (date), immediately after reading a instructional-level text (e.g. graphic novel) of his/her choice, (name) will verbally answer at least (3) WH- questions (e.g. who, what, when, where), provided with the text, with no more than (1) sentence frame per question (e.g. Teacher says "The girl went to the..."), in (4 of 5) reading opportunities.

Understands Stories Read in Class

By (date), after a reader's theater of a story in class, (name) will demonstrate understanding of the story by role playing or acting out the answer for (2) comprehension questions (e.g. "What happens to the main character at the beginning of the story?") for (2 out of 3) stories.

Quote Textual Evidence

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text and given a verbal claim about the text, (name) will support the claim by writing (2) quoted details from the text for (4 out of 5) nonfiction texts.

Use Quotes From Text to Support Thinking

By (date), after reading a grade-level informational text and given a verbal and visual writing prompt (e.g. Teacher says and writes on board "In approximately 200 words, use two quotes to support an explanation of the author’s purpose"), (name) will use at least (2) direct quotes from the text to support both (1) denotative claim and (1) inferential claim about the text when writing a (2)-paragraph response according to a teacher-created rubric, for (3 of 3) essay responses.

Answer Questions Based on a Text

By (date), immediately after reading a instructional-level text (e.g. graphic novel) of his/her choice, (name) will verbally answer at least (3) WH- questions (e.g. who, what, when, where), provided with the text, with no more than (1) sentence frame per question (e.g. Teacher says "The girl went to the..."), in (4 of 5) reading opportunities.

Understands Stories Read in Class

By (date), after a reader's theater of a story in class, (name) will demonstrate understanding of the story by role playing or acting out the answer for (2) comprehension questions (e.g. "What happens to the main character at the beginning of the story?") for (2 out of 3) stories.

Cite Evidence to Support Analysis

After reading text written at grade level, (name) will support a central idea or key conclusion of the text by using (2 or more) pieces of textual evidence (one explicit, and one implicit) to support their analysis for (4 out of 5) texts.

Identify Evidence for a Text's Claim

By (date), after listening to a read aloud of a familiar text, when given a verbal claim about the text (e.g. Teacher says "How do you know that character A is upset with character B?"), (name) will identify at least (2) pieces of evidence from the text by pointing to a photo answer choice (e.g. photos portraying different scenes in the story) from a field of (4) picture answer choices within (10) seconds of the verbal prompt, for (4 out of 5) story comprehension activities.

Cite Evidence to Support Analysis

After reading a text written at grade level, (name) will support a central idea or key conclusion of the text by using (4 or more) pieces of textual evidence (one explicit, and one implicit) to support their analysis for (4 out of 5) texts.

Identify Evidence for a Text's Claim

By (date), after listening to a read aloud of a familiar text, when given a verbal claim about the text (e.g. Teacher says "How do you know that character A is upset with character B?"), (name) will identify at least (2) pieces of evidence from the text by pointing to a photo answer choice (e.g. photos portraying different scenes in the story) from a field of (4) picture answer choices within (10) seconds of the verbal prompt, for (4 out of 5) story comprehension activities.

Cite Strongest Evidence to Support Analysis

By (date), after reading a grade-level informational text, (name) will analyze the text by writing a (5)-sentence paragraph that states the central idea or key conclusion of the text and uses at least (3) pieces of strongest textual evidence (e.g., two explicit, and one implicit) to support their analysis for (4 out of 5) central idea and details activities.

Identify Evidence for a Text's Claim

By (date), after listening to a read aloud of a familiar text, when given a verbal claim about the text (e.g. Teacher says "How do you know that character A is upset with character B?"), (name) will identify at least (2) pieces of evidence from the text by pointing to a photo answer choice (e.g. photos portraying different scenes in the story) from a field of (4) picture answer choices within (10) seconds of the verbal prompt, for (4 out of 5) story comprehension activities.

Support Claims by Citing Evidence

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text and given a written, multi-step prompt, (name) will respond in writing and include (3) pieces of evidence from the text that support claims for (4 out of 5) nonfiction texts.

Cite Evidence from Informational Texts

By (date), after reading a grade-level informational text, (name) will correctly respond to (3 out of 4) short-answer, analytical questions that require (him/her) to infer information from explicit information in the text (e.g. “In his 2005 commencement speech at Stanford University, what did Steve Jobs mean when he said that getting fired from Apple was "the best thing that could have ever happened" to him?) by writing (3-6) sentences, including (1-2) citations of textual evidence from which each inference is logically drawn to support (his/her) answer, for each question for 3 out of 4 texts.

Use Evidence to Answer a Question

By (date), when asked a who, what, where or when question about a familiar informational text, (name) will choose the answer (e.g. by pointing, stating, using eye gaze) from (3) explicit textual details, for (3 out of 3) informational text analyses.

Cite Evidence to Analyze Informational Texts

By (date), after reading a grade-level informational text, (name) will write an analytical essay of (500) words (e.g. "After reading Amy Tan's 'Mother Tongue,' analyze the author's view on how a person's language skills shape his/her public perception.") that provides (5) citations from the text as logical justification for inferences made about the text and (1) reference to and commentary about a matter that remains uncertain for (3 out of 4) texts.

Cite Textual Evidence to Support Analysis

By (date), after reading a nonfiction text and given a written, multi-step prompt, (name) will write a short response that includes (3) pieces of evidence from the text for (4 out of 5) nonfiction texts.

Use Evidence to Answer a Question

By (date), when asked a who, what, where or when question about a familiar informational text, (name) will choose the answer (e.g. by pointing, stating, using eye gaze) from (3) explicit textual details, for (3 out of 3) informational text analyses.

Referenced Strategies

  • Verbal Prompting

    A verbal prompt is an auditory cue that can be used in the classroom to increase the likelihood that the student will respond appropriately ...

  • Preferred Topic or Text

    Allowing students to select a preferred topic or text for a project increases engagement and balances the cognitive load when students are l...

  • Read Aloud

    Read Aloud refers to presenting written text in an auditory format. The teacher can read aloud to the class or students can take turns readi...

  • Picture Choices

    A type of communication that allows students to respond using a picture, symbol, or illustration. Picture choices can be used for multiple c...

  • Familiar Text

    Teachers may provide a previously-taught book or passage as a practice text when students are learning a new skill. Using a familiar text cr...

  • Reader's Theater

    Reader’s Theater is when students read aloud from a script adapted from literature without requiring a set, props, or memorized lines. Stude...